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Self-Quarantine and Isolation Information 

San Diego State University is working diligently to ensure that all community members remain as safe as possible throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific quarantine and isolation information for SDSU residents is available on the SDSU Housing and Residential Education site.

Do you know the difference between quarantine and isolation? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains the difference between quarantine a:

  • Quarantine separates and restricts the movement of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.
  • Isolation separates sick people with a contagious disease from people who are not sick.

If you have tested positive for COVID-19: 

  • Students: Stay at home. Contact your faculty members and, if you work, your supervisor. Also, fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form. This form will provide SDSU with important information to facilitate appropriate discussions regarding communication, cleaning, and initial investigation to determine possible impacts to our community based on your interactions prior to the positive test result. Your personal information and diagnoses will remain confidential. 
  • Employees: Stay at home. Contact your supervisor and contact the Center for Human Resources immediately. Also, fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form. This form will provide SDSU with important information to facilitate appropriate discussions regarding communication, cleaning, and initial investigation to determine possible impacts to our community based on your interactions prior to the positive test result. Your personal information and diagnoses will remain confidential. 

To minimize health risks and make our campus as safe as possible, SDSU is implementing health and safety requirements for those who will be living or working on campus:

  • Facial coverings are requried for everyone on campus, with very limited exceptions. 
  • Temperate checks for employees.
  • Physical distancing in all spaces including classrooms, research facilities, offices and public spaces, as well as reduced housing density for students living on campus. 
  • Enhanced cleaning protocols.  

Based on the latest guidance from local, state and federal public health officials, individuals should follow quarantine and isolation protocols in the event of an exposure or infection of COVID-19.

Possibly Exposed to COVID-19? You Should Quarantine. 

Cuándo ponerse en cuarentena (En Español)

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps prevent the spread of COVID-19. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health department and their medical provider.

You should stay home for 14 days after your last contact with a person who has COVID-19, including people who have taken a serologic (antibody) test and have antibodies to the virus.

  • Stay home for 14 days after your last contact with a person who has COVID-19. 
  • Watch for fever (100 F), cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19. 
  • Stay away from others, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19. 

Sick and Confirmed to have Virus. You Must Isolate at Home. 

Aíslese si está enfermo (En Español) 

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), isolation is used to separate people infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 from people who are not infected. People who are in isolation should stay home until it is safe for them to be around others. In the home, anyone sick or infected should separate themselves from others by staying in a specific “sick room” or area and using a separate bathroom, if available. 

People who have COVID-19 have symptoms of COVID-19 and are able to recover at home. Those who have no symptoms (are asymptomatic) but have tested positive for infection should also isolate. 

You should stay home for at least 10 days after onset of symptoms or from your test date (if asymptomatic). You must also be fever free for 24 hours and your symptoms must be resolving.  Your medical provider will give you guidance on the length of your isolation.

  • Wear a face covering when around other people. 
  • Monitor your symptoms. Seek emergency medical care immediately if you experience any of the emergency warning signs (including trouble breathing). 
  • Regularly clean surfaces, especially shared surfaces. 
  • Stay in a separate room from other household members, if possible. 
  • Do not share dishes or other household items, if possible.
  • If you have housemates, use a separate bathroom, if possible.
  • Avoid contact with other members of the household and pets. 
  • Do not share personal household items, such as cups, towels, and utensils.