Close

 

The Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Information for:

San Diego State University has shifted all instruction to virtual modalities. For Fall 2020, the majority of courses will be offered via virtual modalities, as aligned with the California State University system, and through a campus-wide model and plan, called SDSU Flex. Read the May 12 campus notice for more information. 

All non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the SDSU campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

SDSU is closely monitoring the worldwide situation regarding the coronavirus (COVID-19), declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. SDSU, in its decision-making regarding COVID-19, follows the guidance of the San Diego County Health and Human Services (HHSA), California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of State.

Cares Disbursement

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed the House of Representatives, and was then signed into law by the president. The act provides federal government support in the wake of the coronavirus public health crisis and associated economic fallout. One section of the CARES Act established the Higher Education Emergency Relief fund and is providing the nation’s colleges and universities funding to then provide grants to students. This funding also covers a portion of unbudgeted costs and lost revenue due to the disruption of campus activities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

San Diego State University applied for funding from the federal CARES Act and received $29 million, of which more than $14 million is being dispersed to students. Upon receiving the funding allocation in early May 2020, SDSU then began to quickly distribute grants to students based on their documented financial need. Recipients were notified via their campus email addresses, text and phone calls. All told, 23,951 eligible SDSU students received CARES Act funding between $250 and $800 per student. Eligibility was determined using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). 

Students who are eligible to file a FAFSA and have not, are being encouraged to complete one as soon as possible.  The remaining funding will be awarded to students who complete a FAFSA or who apply for additional funding through the SDSU Emergency Crisis Response Team.   

SDSU has signed and returned to the Department the Certification and Agreement to the U.S. Department of Education indicating that the university received the funds and has provided CARES Act emergency aid to students. Award amounts differed based on full-time or part-time enrollment status, as well as by financial aid eligibility status, with Pell Grant, State University Grant (SUG), and Cal Grant eligible students receiving higher amounts. 

Please visit this site often as it is updated regularly.

Other Resources

U.S. Government Information

State of California Information

California State University Information

San Diego County Resources

The San Diego Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) additional resources:

Imperial County Public Health Department Resources

Sign Up for SDSU Alerts

The community can register through the Emergency Alert System.

Emergency Alert System

 

Recent COMMUNICATIONS

The following earlier e-mail messages have been shared with the SDSU campus community and include some of the university's targeted communications:

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes.

On March 15, in an all-campus email, the university announced additional steps in the university's efforts to enhance social distancing and response. This included moving all instructional activities and office hours – including for any remaining lab courses –virtual platforms.

Fully virtual means that all course material is delivered through a web-based format, whereas a distributed class may include aspects of digital or web-supported formats, such as synchronous live lectures delivered from one’s office or distributed materials that are returned to the instructor via a variety of modalities. These options should provide maximum flexibility to each instructor within the confines of this very challenging public health care environment.

It is with the greatest level of caution that SDSU decided to cancel Explore SDSU.

With the guidance of the California State University system, SDSU chose to cancel the event out of an abudance of caution for public health, and given concerns with shifting travel availability.

In its place, two Virtual Explore events were held. Recorded information from these sessions is available here.

No, not at this time. SDSU is closely following information relating to COVID-19. The risk of COVID-19 exposure within California and at SDSU remains low. SDSU has suspended its study abroad programs and has directed its participants to return to their home to self-isolate for 14 days, as recommended by the CDC. The university has opted to move courses into virtual spaces, and it remains open.

Prior to the statewide stay-at-home order, for all events and meetings, regardless of the size, SDSU instituted rigorous environmental cleaning before and after the event/meeting, as well encouraged the practice of preventive behaviors (e.g., providing hand sanitizer, tissue, etc.).

Additional cleaning is occurring out of an abundance of caution. You may see individuals wearing protective gear during this time.

Our priority will be to offer the maximum amount of flexibility, so that we can be nimble as COVID-19 conditions change in the future, especially as we continue to observe the guidance from the CSU and physical distancing guidelines by county, state and federal orders. 

We are doing the following: 

  • We are moving most of our classes into virtual modalities, aligned with the California State University system’s decision to do so. We will offer certain lab, art studio, and performance-based courses in person, including clinical offerings that are required for licensure, while we continue offering lecture-based instruction via virtual modalities. 
  • We are expanding customized training for faculty members. The Flexible Course Design Summer Institute had nearly 300 faculty sign up in the first 24 hours when it was launched. As of May 21, about 600 faculty have signed up. 
  • We are also addressing accessibility and inclusivity, to ensure the quality education for all of our students.
  • We are expanding online activities and student support services significantly, to ensure SDSU activities, centers, and programs are still available to all our students. 
  • We are working tirelessly to identify and increase robust financial aid for our students.
SDSU Flex calls for high customization and will allow the maximum amount of flexibility to our community as COVID-19 conditions change in the future. With all lecture-based instruction intended to occur online in the fall, the SDSU Flex model will offer maximum opportunities for students to remain fully engaged with their faculty, staff members, peers and SDSU alumni — no matter their physical location. The model provides flexibility to our faculty, reducing the number of courses that may be needed to transition to fully virtual in the event of a second wave of the virus. SDSU Flex will also provide extensive time for faculty to prepare and modify their courses for the fall, in ways that differ drastically from the emergency move this spring.

Through the SDSU Flex model for Fall 2020, the university will: 

  • In consultation and agreement with the CSU, offer certain lab, art studio, and performance-based courses in person, including clinical offerings required for licensure, while offering lecture-based instruction via virtual modalities. 
  • Expand existing, customized pedagogy training for faculty members, which will also address accessibility and inclusivity, to ensure quality education. A training institute was launched for faculty. Faculty can learn more or sign up by visiting the Instructional Technology Services Training & Workshops site
  • Significantly expand online activities and student support service, and also maintain robust financial aid for our students.  
  • Carefully open the campus in phases based on guidelines beginning with faculty who need to return to their research or creative work in on-campus facilities.  
  • Continue to collaborate with county public health officials and to advocate the return of research and instructional faculty to campus as soon as permitted, and as we can safely increase support staffing to maintain campus safety. 
The majority of courses will be offered via virtual modalities, as aligned with the California State University system. CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White announced on May 12 that all 23 campuses in the system, including San Diego State University, will move forward with planning for virtual instruction, with some exceptions, for Fall 2020. SDSU President Adela de la Torre announced shortly thereafter that after thorough and careful assessment and feedback from faculty and staff who have shared their expertise, and following this directive from the CSU, the university would offer virtual instruction in the fall through the campus-wide model, called SDSU Flex, the university-wide response to COVID-19 pandemic-related disruptions.
SDSU’s plans are in alignment with the California State University system-wide virtual approach. On May 12, CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White announced the system’s plan and said: “It would be irresponsible to wait until summer to plan for virtual learning across the curriculum. It is wise to plan now and over the next several months for enriched training and virtual learning environments and to be able to pull back again in the fall as in-person circumstances might be further allowed. It would be irresponsible to approach it the other way around.”
No. The plan is for the majority of courses to be offered via virtual modalities, as aligned with the California State University system. CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White announced on May 12 that all 23 campuses in the system, including San Diego State University, will move forward with planning for virtual instruction, with exceptions for those courses which cannot be done virtually (e.g. lab courses, some clinical or experiential courses, some art or performance based courses), for Fall 2020.
Yes. The California State University system-wide virtual approach will allow for variability across the campuses, and CSU courses, especially lecture-type courses, will primarily be delivered virtually. However, only instruction and activities that cannot be delivered virtually will be conducted in-person, and with strict standards for safety and welfare.

The California State University (CSU) is establishing a process by which all 23 campuses can share their academic planning for Fall 2020 for review and approval, including which courses will be subject to exception and offered in-person. SDSU is currently in active conversations with faculty, with the CSU, and with Public Health experts as part of this review and approval process.  

We are working as expeditiously as possible to make these determinations  and will announce specific courses’ modality when the process is completed. More details, as plans are approved, will be shared at sdsu.edu/COVID19 later this month.

SDSU has been actively augmenting its investments in our instructional technology infrastructure and faculty training in order to deliver a dynamic and high quality learning experience that will allow our students to move towards their academic goals without interruptions. 

Virtual instruction is not new to SDSU. For years, we have been moving summer classes to virtual environments without sacrificing the quality of experience or instruction. We have found that when students and faculty members embrace the strengths of virtual instruction, both discover that there are ways to customize their learning environments, while maintaining critical in-person elements when most needed.

Also, SDSU’s Instructional Technology Services has been a recognized national leader for the last 10 years, offering extensive training and preparation for our faculty members so that they can teach using virtual modalities in accordance with Quality Online Learning and Teaching standards. Through new training institutes launched in the spring, faculty are learning new ways to expand their use of digital and virtual platforms to provide lectures, interact in virtual office hours, foster discussions, and conduct exams. 

Further, we are substantially increasing the number of sections for in-person courses, both to increase physical distancing and to improve faculty to student ratios. SDSU is committed to improving interactivity and quality for Fall instruction, regardless of whether the course is being conducted virtually, in a hybrid format, or in-person. We are confident that even during these challenging times our students will greatly benefit from engaging instruction and educational experiences—while also benefiting from meaningful interaction with award-winning faculty members, campus advising and tutoring support. 

As noted in the message about SDSU’s planning efforts around a repopulation plan, the university’s initial plan will follow San Diego County, California and national public health authority guidelines, and will require the California State University system Chancellor's Office approval. A plan has been developed to address research, creative activities and community service projects conducted in all SDSU and SDSU Research Foundation spaces, both on- and off-campus. This plan is currently awaiting approval by the CSU Chancellor’s Office. 

The plan will allow repopulation of faculty and staff in phases to ensure: 1) the health of university employees and 2) that appropriate resources, personal protective equipment (PPE), and staffing are available to keep our community and our spaces safe. Faculty will be asked to prepare specific repopulation plans for their respective spaces following campus guidelines for review and approval by campus leadership.

Not all employees are able to return to campus at this time; only essential personnel and researchers engaged in critical work that cannot be done remotely or deferred are currently on campus, and other employees continue to telework. 

However, regarding research faculty, on May 12, California state guidelines were updated to permit low density repopulation of personnel who cannot work from home, while maintaining key practices: physical distancing, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), disinfection and proper hygiene. Following this change, we are required to obtain approval of the California State University Chancellor and review of our plan by the County of San Diego Public Health Service prior to restarting research, creative activities, and community service projects on campus. Our draft SDSU Faculty and Graduate Student Repopulation Plan allows for a low density of faculty and staff to return to campus with strict limits on room density and other key practices noted above. Each faculty member will be required to submit a plan describing how they will meet these requirements. More information on this plan will be shared early next week.

Students we are not able to accommodate would have their initial housing deposit refunded. We are, however, working to accommodate as many residents as possible, respecting physical distancing orders. At this time, we do not know the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impact will reduce housing capacity, based on our current conversations with county public health and California State University officials. Once our plan is approved, we will share more information. 

To provide maximum flexibility, we are suspending the freshman parking restriction for the 2020-21 academic year so that freshmen may bring their vehicles to campus. Yes, those who choose to do so will still be required to pay for parking if they are parking on campus.

Yes, the university does plan to return students to campus housing for Fall 2020, with a reduction in density to respect physical distance orders.

SDSU is in active conversations with the CSU Chancellor’s Office, as well as local and state health officials, including the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, regarding student housing arrangements. While we know that capacity will be reduced to accommodate social distancing requirements, we continue to assess the COVID-19 situation in our area and are identifying a plan that would provide the greatest flexibility to our students for Fall 2020 in alignment with the academic and co-curricular offerings. We are hoping to have approval of our plan soon, and are prioritizing preparing and sharing timely updates as decisions are made. 

The university does plan to return students to campus housing for Fall 2020, respecting physical distance orders. We cannot say at this time, however, how the sophomore housing lottery will be managed. Additional information regarding student housing is forthcoming soon, with approval from the California State University system.

We continue to enhance our student support services, facilities and program offerings with you in mind. Our primary responsibility is to provide a safe and welcoming environment to all student residents. The university is planning to have student residents on campus respecting physical distancing orders, but it is not yet determined how many will be living in on campus housing. For those who will be living on campus, you will have access to inclusive living communities and the kinds of learning opportunities that will support your holistic growth. Full-time staff including Residence Halls Coordinators, RAs/CAs, and Front Desk Assistants will be available in the on-campus communities to support student success as well as safety. 

SDSU does not have the ability to impact off campus lease terms. However, a number of third-party housing companies have extended flexibility to allow students and residents to separate from their leases without financial penalty. Some off-campus landlords or leasing companies will also allow subletting or reletting of space, in addition to other options. We encourage our students to work with their off-campus property managers to explore what options, if any, they have to get out of their leases.

For those where this is not possible, SDSU is offering assistance in navigating needed financial or housing support through the Economic Crisis Response Team. Students can reach out to the team via the online ECRT assistance request form.

Meal plan packages have been updated for the 2020-21 academic year to provide increased flexibility of options. Students can choose a Mini Plan, Select Plan, or Prime Value Plan that includes an allotment of meals and weekly declining balances. More information about housing rates and meal plan options will be available at housing.sdsu.edu/costs.

Meals plans for freshmen students living on campus are required. Meal plans for sophomore and upper division students living on campus are optional. Meal plans are not required for any students living off-campus. 

While the university continues to assess county, state and federal orders and works in consultation with the California State University system, SDSU has not yet made any decisions about altering in-person events or athletic events for Fall 2020. In a May 12 joint statement with the Mountain West Conference, of which SDSU is a member, the university shared the following: “Certainly, all conversations are led by academics, as well as public health and safety. Within that framework, more determinations are necessary. Any decisions will be communicated to students, faculty and staff.” 

The university is preparing to provide more details on this question once plans are approved. We understand that this period of uncertainty can be especially difficult for our campus community and are prioritizing, preparing and sharing timely updates as decisions are made. San Diego State University is in active conversations with the California State University (CSU) Chancellor’s Office, as well as local and state health officials, including the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, regarding student housing arrangements. Our priority remains the health and safety of our campus community. Additional information regarding student housing is forthcoming, with approval from the CSU. More details, as plans are approved, will be shared at sdsu.edu/COVID19 later this month and into the summer. 

Mandatory fees and tuition will not be discounted or reimbursed. Campus mandatory fees are not subject to refund except in very limited circumstances because they generally cover fixed and ongoing expenses and costs that the university continues to incur during the pandemic to finance, maintain and operate student facilities and programs (many of which remain available to students via remote access). Examples of these costs include but are not limited to ongoing administrative and overhead costs such as student government programs, academic retention and support, progress toward degree completion, employee wages and benefits, expenses for utilities, repair and maintenance, and payment of financing and long-term debt obligations for some facilities. 

Students pay campus mandatory fees regardless of whether they are a full-time student, part-time student, online student or a student studying abroad – and even if they do not expect to ever use the programs or facilities they support. We hope that students understand that if they want the facilities and programs to be available to them now and in the future, they must, of course, be financially supported and maintained during the pandemic.  

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees sets tuition costs. The CSU system said instruction on all 23 CSU campuses, including SDSU, is being conducted via hybrid, virtual and in-person (as exceptions) on a temporary basis to ensure that students continue their education and maintain their progress toward degree completion despite the current public health crisis. Tuition will therefore not be refunded.

While governed by CSU systemwide policy, because local campus student fees and the services and facilities they support vary across the system, local campuses can, however, make decisions about how to handle certain types of fees. SDSU has already chosen to issue prorated reimbursements for fees associated with covering services such as housing, meal plans and dining, or parking, for Spring 2020.

Finally, the university does have a process for students to request a refund for tuition and mandatory fees based on special circumstances. These special circumstances include tuition and fees that were assessed or collected in error; the course for which Tuition and Fees were assessed or collected was canceled by the university; the university makes a decision that the student was not eligible to enroll in the term for which tuition and fees were assessed or collected; or the student was activated for mandatory military service. If you believe you can demonstrate exceptional circumstances warranting a refund, you may petition in accordance with the campus policy

If you need to defer your admission for personal reasons, you can submit an application to appeal on the SDSU Office of Admissions site. Each appeal application will be evaluated on its merit on a case by case basis. If your request is approved, you may need to reapply to Cal State Apply upon your return. However, we highly discourage students from deferring their admissions. SDSU has been actively investing in preparing a dynamic and meaningful learning experience that will allow our students to move towards their academic goals without interruptions. With the benefit of innovative solutions that will provide students a rich experience beyond the classroom we are confident that we will deliver a robust virtual education experience for our students.

First, we affirm and understand this is a difficult time--not only for SDSU students but for students all across the country. All admitted and continuing students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll and continue progress toward their degree, as the academic experience and the SDSU degree remain highly valuable, both in comparison to other Universities and to employers. In March, SDSU, along with the rest of the CSU, was required to quickly transition to offering courses and academic support to our students virtually. This pivot has provided us with insights and lessons that expand the adaptability of our instructional processes and our planning for Fall. With the benefit of constant monitoring, planning and consultation, as well as additional professional development and training for our faculty and staff, we are confident that we can deliver a robust virtual education experience for our students. We will also leverage innovative solutions to provide students a rich experience beyond the classroom, and will plan to add additional layers of in-person or hybrid experiences as conditions may permit, in the Fall. 

If you would like to move forward with a leave of absence, you can do so by contacting  the university registrar at https://registrar.sdsu.edu/students/academic_status/leave_of_absence

Although the transition to virtual course delivery will decrease the number of student jobs needed on campus for Fall 2020, federal work study jobs still remain available, and our auxiliary organizations continue to have some job opportunities for students in research, food services, bookstore and other service areas. Following the summer recess, SDSU and its auxiliaries will strive to bring back as many existing student employees as possible as the campus repopulates over the academic year and also hire additional students as needed based on new virtual or hybrid campus activities and needs. 

Aztec Shops, in particular, strives to bring back as many existing student employees as possible, and hire additional students as needed, based on campus activity, food service and bookstore customer demand. 

For Associated Students, there is also increased work in virtual programming and communications to maximize opportunities for students to engage and to meet their changing needs. Associated Students will also continue to assess and need student jobs to support: Aztec Recreation, including for virtual and live workout resources, ESports leagues, and more; the Aztec Student Union for different daily programming; Business Services and banking training sessions; Government Affairs; and much more to come. 

The Economic Crisis Response Team is also available to assist students in identifying campus employment, and students can reach out to the team via the online ECRT assistance request form.

With a summer to prepare for the SDSU Flex environment, SDSU will continue to offer high quality and interactive activities for students, staff, and faculty. Partners across campus are planning virtual and hybrid delivery for co-curricular campus programs, including, but not limited to undergraduate research, entrepreneurship, community building, leadership programming, and service. While we plan to focus on virtual engagement, there will be in-person offerings respecting physical distancing and other public health orders. Many SDSU centers, including and not limited to the Cultural Centers, Commuter Resource Center, Joan and Art Barron Veterans Center, Glazer Center for Leadership & Service, and Career Services will continue to offer virtual office hours, student-centered, events, and opportunities to connect with staff and small group activities. 

Critical events that are central to our SDSU culture, like New Student and Family Convocation, Aztec Nights, One SDSU Community, will be offered virtually to welcome incoming students to our rich and vibrant campus community. 

Constructing an immersive student-focused virtual experience that creates social engagement and easy pathways for student involvement, access to student success services and integrated health and well-being resources. We are working diligently to ensure our new students will experience a successful transition to our supportive campus community. 

In addition, as county and state restrictions permit, the university will also explore phasing in additional in-person and hybrid student experiences throughout the fall semester.

Recognized Student Organizations, including fraternities and sororities, are expected to be able to organize and host events during the fall. All organizational events will be expected to follow public health guidance and university policies, Student Life & Leadership is available to support organizations planning for the fall. 

SDSU is committed to offering robust co-curricular engagement opportunities for students during the fall. We plan to deliver activities, including but not limited to events, training, and mentoring, while supporting student leadership opportunities in Recognized Student Organizations, Fraternity & Sorority Life, Associated Students, and more. Students can access virtual event offerings by visiting: https://newscenter.sdsu.edu/student_affairs/virtual-events.aspx? .

The Aztec Recreation Center (ARC) plans to open once county, state and federal orders allow the center to do so. Gym facilities such as the ARC are part of Phase 3 of the California reopening plan shared by CA Governor Gavin Newsom.

Aztec Recreation Center (ARC) membership billing is currently frozen. ARC billing will be reinstated when the facility reopens. We will communicate with members prior to reopening to inform them when billing will begin. 

SDSU community members coming to campus are currently encouraged to wear a facial covering from home. We do not expect this guidance will change in the near term. Facial masks such as N95 and KN95 are reserved for personnel who are health care providers and first responders.  All other campus occupants are able to use cloth face coverings that can be laundered. Campus has a limited supply and encourages our community to bring their own from home.  Those of us requiring gloves for their work will be provided with items appropriate for their work type which may be nitrile, latex, leather or rubberized synthetic material.  Other PPE specific to job function may include half face respirators and cartridges and Tyvek suits.

Supply chains for PPE and cleaning supplies are greatly impacted by this pandemic. SDSU is utilizing our vendor relationships and the sourcing power of the full CSU system to ensure we have the supplies on hand to support the levels of repopulation being contemplated. Where possible, the campus will supplement PPE needs. In addition, PPE items will be available for sale at the SDSU Bookstore.   

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed the House of Representatives, and was then signed into law by the president. The act provides federal government support in the wake of the coronavirus public health crisis and associated economic fallout. One section of the CARES Act established the Higher Education Emergency Relief fund and is providing the nation’s colleges and universities funding to then provide grants to students. This funding also covers a portion of unbudgeted costs and lost revenue due to the disruption of campus activities due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
The CSU Cares Program offers emergency grants for CSU students experiencing financial hardships directly due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The funding is made possible through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF) authorized by the recent CARES Act, as well as existing CSU campus-based resources. Each CSU campus will distribute grants based on three shared CSU principles: Student Success, Equity, and also Timeliness and Administrative Simplicity.
SDSU applied for funding from the federal CARES Act. The university received that funding from the U.S. Department of Education. SDSU then began to quickly distribute grants to students based on their documented financial need. Recipients were notified via their campus email addresses, text and phone calls.
No, only those students who are eligible to file a FAFSA and have a verified FAFSA on file are eligible to receive federal funding through CARES. That includes undergraduate and graduate students. Eligible students are those currently enrolled undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are eligible to receive federal financial aid and were not enrolled in a completely online program as of March 13, 2020. All other currently enrolled students may receive emergency grants supported by other sources of institutional funding. Grants may be pro-rated for part-time students. Even if students have current financial holds or owe the campus fees or fines, they are still eligible to receive funding
SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley graduate students who are eligible to file a FAFSA and have a verified FAFSA on file are eligible to receive federal funding through CARES. If you have not filed a FAFSA, you are encouraged to do so immediately to determine eligibility for the funds.
No, you do not qualify for CARES funding. The U.S. The Department of Education establishes eligibility requirements, one of which is that all students who receive CARES Act funding must be a U.S. citizen or have eligible noncitizen status. SDSU will, however, provide financial support relying on other, non-federal funding sources. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students may also request assistance through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
No, you do not qualify for CARES funding. The U.S. The Department of Education establishes eligibility requirements, one of which is that all students who receive CARES Act funding must be a U.S. citizen or have eligible noncitizen status. SDSU is, however, offering funding to international students. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students may also request assistance through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
No, you do not qualify for CARES funding. The U.S. The Department of Education establishes eligibility requirements, one of which is that all students who receive CARES Act funding must be making satisfactory progress towards their degree completion. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students may also request assistance through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.

Due to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, SDSU is not able to provide parents and families with information about student records, including a student’s eligibility status for CARES funding or funding disbursement amount. SDSU’s Office of Financial Aid & Scholarships has disbursed CARES Act funds to eligible students. Students who file the FASFSA will need to check their AidLink account for information regarding their eligibility.

SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students who require financial or other assistance may seek support through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.

SDSU received $29 million as part of the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act in support of students. Of the $29 million awarded, at least 50% will be available for students to support food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care needs. The funding is prorated based on the student's documented financial need and enrollment. Eligible undergraduate students will receive between $250 and $800. Grants will be based on Spring 2020 enrollment. Eligible students enrolled: full-time will receive $800; enrolled ¾ time will receive $600; half-time will get $400; and less than half time will receive $250. Eligible graduate students will receive up to $800.
Yes, in addition to providing federal funding to students with financial need as a result of COVID-19, the remaining funds will cover a portion of SDSU’s COVID-19-related expenses and lost revenue.
CARES Act funding must be used for specific purposes. It may only be used to help eligible students with food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care. The funding will also cover a portion of SDSU’s COVID-19-related expenses and lost revenue.
Yes, students may only use CARES Act funding for food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, and child care.
No, students who receive CARES Act funding will not have to return the funds.
We recognize that the funding provided through the CARES Act may only cover a portion of financial need for some students. Other help is available to you, and you will not have to pay back the funding you receive through the CARES Act. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley students who require financial or other assistance may seek support through the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
Yes, that is a possibility. All returning students are asked to submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for the 2020-2021 school year online at www.fafsa.govhttps://studentaffairs.sdsu.edu/faodad/webal$al.main. SDSU and SDSU Imperial Valley who require additional assistance are asked to reach out to the Economic Crisis Response Team by filling out the online form: https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?SanDiegoStateUniv&layout_id=19.
Given the shortened residential experience, and with the greatest concern for students and their families impacted by COVID-19 disruptions, SDSU opted to provide students with prorated refunds for housing and meal plans. In addition, SDSU students are able to request prorated reimbursements for semester parking passes. The university, through a fundraising initiative, has also raised tens of thousands of emergency funding for students experiencing crises.
No. The IRS reports that emergency financial aid grants under the CARES Act for unexpected expenses, unmet financial need, or expenses related to the disruption of campus operations on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, such as unexpected expenses for food, housing, course materials, technology, health care, or childcare, are qualified disaster relief payments under section 139 of the Internal Revenue Code.
No. The IRS reports that because the emergency financial aid grant is not includible in your gross income, you cannot claim any deduction or credit for expenses paid with the grant including the tuition and fees deduction, the American Opportunity Credit, or the Lifetime Learning Credit.

SDSU is involved in the following as a precaution during the growing public health threat associated with the COVID-19 outbreak.
The university:

  • Is providing updates to campus to students, faculty and staff via in person and email communications. Some communications occur more directly through guidance being provided to segments of the students, faculty and staff populations.
  • Is continuously monitoring and following recommendations of the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA), the California State University system, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of State.
  • Established a group of campus health officials and specialists who are regularly communicating to assess needed action and communication related to this swiftly moving global public health situation.
  • Suspended university-related study abroad programs.
  • Is providing screening for students who visit Student Health Services who have a fever, cough, sore throat, or other symptoms consistent with upper respiratory infections.
  • Prior to the statewide stay-at-home order, SDSU instituted rigorous environmental cleaning before and after the event/meeting, as well encouraging the practice of preventive behaviors (e.g., providing hand sanitizer, tissue, etc.). Additional cleaning is occurring out of an abundance of caution. You may see individuals wearing protective gear during this time.

SDSU has an established protocol for communicating when a public health authority confirms COVID-19 cases among members of the campus community.

Any student, faculty or staff member with a confirmed COVID-19 case is asked to share that information with SDSU through the COVID-19 Reporting Form. The university does not provide testing for the coronavirus and does not confirm COVID-19 cases, but will share certain information provided by county and other public health authorities.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The novel coronavirus was first identified in Wuhan, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

The coronavirus can spread from person-to-person, through close contact, and primarily through coughing and sneezing. Washing hands, cleaning commonly touched surfaces, and avoiding sick people are the best ways to prevent the illness from spreading.

Additionally, beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will also be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

COVID-19 is an emerging disease and is not yet entirely understood. Public health officials are still learning about the transmissibility, severity, and other features of the virus.

More information is available on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website regarding coronavirus symptoms.

There is currently no vaccine for COVID-19. However, it is currently the flu and respiratory disease season, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine. Also, everyone is encouraged to take everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.

You may be at greater risk if you have recently traveled to regions where there are currently outbreaks of the virus, or if you have come into close contact with someone who has the virus. Symptoms typically appear within two to 14 days after exposure.

If you are not feeling well, stay home from work, school, and other errands, if possible. Remain home until you have been without a fever for at least 24 hours.

Two SDSU study abroad students and one SDSU employee are confirmed to have COVID-19, but health officials deem campus risk to be low.

Be attentive to the most recent information on the outbreak, available via the CDC's COVID-19 page and the World Health Organization's COVID-19 site.

Please note, beginning Tuesday, March 17, all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

Take care of your health and protect others by doing the following:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash them with soap and water. Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand sanitizer kills viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Avoid individuals who are ill, particularly if they are coughing or sneezing.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with your arm or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Properly dispose of any used tissues immediately.
  • Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough or difficulty breathing, seek medical attention.
  • Beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

Additional protection measures are suggested for those who are in or who have recently visited (defined as within the last 14 days) areas where COVID-19 is present. You are asked to:

  • Stay at home and self-isolate if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache and slight runny nose, until you recover.
  • If you develop fever, cough or difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers.

The university encourages all members of the campus community to remain home from school or work if they become sick. Inform your supervisor or faculty member of your absense.

Please note all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

If you believe that a staff member has COVID-19 or has had very close contact with a person who has COVID-19 (such as living in the same household), please contact the Office of Employee Relations and Compliance at 619-594-6464 for guidance.

Please note all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus. Such employees are asked to telework.

Please follow the direction from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding prevention. The recommended steps include washing your hands often, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, staying home when you are ill, and also cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

Also, beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

SDSU also recommends continuing to read e-mails and updates from SDSU, and regularly checking this site. SDSU will continue to share important updates and information as this situation evolves and recommend any additional steps that students should take to stay well.

We know that some members of the SDSU community are feeling greater stress than usual, and I want to encourage you to seek out support and information from the many organizations on campus that are here for you.

Also, as with any natural or human-inflicted disaster, COVID-19 can lead to additional stress and worry to members of our community, including those who have personal connections to affected areas. This is a critically-important time for all of us to reinforce a community of care on our campus and support one another.

If you would like to talk with someone, support is available to students through campus mental health services:

Students can contact SDSU’s Counseling and Psychological Services, which is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 pm., by calling 619-594-5220. The After-Hours Crisis Line is 888-724-7240. For emergencies, call 911.

Faculty and staff can rely on the Employee Assistance Program which offers SDSU faculty and staff confidential support for a variety of concerns, including emotional, relationship, health, legal and workplace issues. Information, resources and tools are available by calling 1-800-342-8111 and visiting the EAP website.

Prior to the statewide stay-at-home order, for all events and meetings, regardless of the size, SDSU instituted rigorous environmental cleaning before and after the event/meeting, as well encouraged the practice of preventive behaviors (e.g., providing hand sanitizer, tissue, etc.). Additional cleaning is occurring out of an abundance of caution. You may see individuals wearing protective gear during this time. 

No, not at this time. SDSU is closely following information relating to COVID-19. The risk of COVID-19 exposure within California and at SDSU remains low. SDSU has suspended its study abroad programs and has directed its participants to return to their home to self-isolate for 14 days, as recommended by the CDC. The university has opted to move courses into virtual spaces, and it remains open.

Also, prior to the statewide stay-at-home order, for all events and meetings, regardless of the size, SDSU instituted rigorous environmental cleaning before and after the event/meeting, as well encouraged the practice of preventive behaviors (e.g., providing hand sanitizer, tissue, etc.).

Additional cleaning is occurring out of an abundance of caution. You may see individuals wearing protective gear during this time.

Yes. Beginning Tuesday, March 17, all non-essential personnel, and essential personnel whose work can be accomplished remotely, are asked not to come to the San Diego State University campus.

Employees were asked to make arrangements no later than Tuesday, March 17, and Wednesday, March 18 allowing employees to gather any essential work materials and equipment from their offices to successfully telework from home.

To support those who telework, SDSU’s Information Technology Services has introduced [email protected]: Remote Work Resources. This new site provides tools and resources for remote work, including request forms for equipment and other materials that may be provided without having to come to campus. Additional resources and direction to facilitate telework will be provided as soon as possible.

Further, you can contact the Office of Employee Relations and Compliance at 619-594-6464 to discuss reasonable accommodations.

No, upon careful consideration of the potential health and financial risks to students and their families, and due to the long-term uncertainty of the impact of COVID-19, SDSU has decided to suspend all study abroad programs administered by SDSU Global Affairs for spring break and summer and SDSU’s inbound and outbound study abroad exchange programs for fall 2020.

The university does not have the authority to suspend third-party partner programs in other countries.

Students should speak with their assistant deans who, at the department level, can identify the best alternate options. Also, to help mitigate academic disruption, SDSU will offer waivers to the international experience requirement to seniors graduating in May, August, or December 2020.

Students who are unsure if their study abroad program is administered by SDSU Global Affairs, should contact the SDSU Study Abroad office at 619-594-2475 or [email protected].

After thorough assessment, SDSU has decided to suspend all study abroad programs administered by SDSU Global Affairs for spring break and summer and SDSU’s inbound and outbound study abroad exchange programs for fall 2020, The university does not have the authority to suspend third-party partner programs in other countries.

Among the spring break and summer programs now suspended are: SDSU faculty-led programs, Transborder programs, Travel embedded in SDSU courses, SDSU’s Health and Human Services 350, and summer SDSU Exchange programs.

Any students with study abroad-related questions should contact the SDSU Study Abroad office at 619-594-2475 or [email protected]

The

CDC offers travel guidance. You are asked to:

  • Stay at home and self-isolate if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache and slight runny nose, until you recover.
  • If you develop fever, cough or difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers.
  • Additionally, beginning Friday, May 1, all County residents will also be required to cover their face while they are out in public and within six feet of someone that is not a household member.

At this time, health officials deem campus risk to be low.

Please call a medical professional if, in the last 14 days, you:

  • Have traveled to an affected geographic area and have a fever and signs or symptoms of a lower respiratory illness (cough, shortness of breath), or
  • Have a fever with a severe acute lower respiratory illness that requires hospitalization and doesn't have an alternative explanatory diagnosis (e.g., influenza) and no known source of your exposure, or
  • Were in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 and have a fever or signs or symptoms of a lower respiratory illness (cough, shortness of breath).

When you call, please inform them of your symptoms and recent travel or potential exposure before going to the health facility.

We urge you to be attentive to travel advisories and existing regulations, and to follow the guidance provided by agencies, such as the CDC and the U.S. Department of State.

Please note, the CSU has extended the travel suspension through July 31. This travel suspension restricts all international and non-essential domestic travel at least through July 31 due both to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and the U.S. Department of State’s worldwide travel advisory remaining at a level 4.

Please familiarize yourself with the following:

If you are traveling in or returning from other countries, you may be asked by a public health official to restrict travel or to self-quarantine in certain circumstances. We urge you to follow the guidance of public health officials and government agencies.

In the rare instance travel could be deemed essential, please submit a written email justification via your supervisor to your Dean or Vice President for review and approval. Documentation (e.g. email) of Dean or Vice President approval must be submitted with your T-2 Travel Authorization Form.

Written justification is necessary to document that the traveler has obtained the required approval to travel on essential university-related business during the travel suspension.

Yes, travelers should make every effort to claim a refund. Many airlines, hotels and car rental companies are refunding or crediting individuals for these transactions. Travelers should collect and maintain documentation about the refund/credit request and outcome.

Refund requests that were denied by the travel partner are eligible for full reimbursement.

Refunds granted in the form of a voucher to the traveler are also eligible for full reimbursement, however will be treated as a travel advance to be applied to future university-related business travel. If the traveler uses the voucher for personal use, it will be reported as income subject to payroll tax withholding per IRS regulations.

Faculty/staff reimbursements through a travel claim or direct payment form for approved expenses may take 3-5 business days for reimbursement via direct deposit and 10 business days for a mailed check. Student reimbursements for airfare once  all required documents are submitted may take10 business days for a mailed check.

 Yes, travelers should make every effort to claim a refund. Many airlines, hotels and car rental companies are refunding or crediting individuals for these transactions. Travelers should collect and maintain documentation about the refund/credit request and outcome. Refund requests that were denied by the travel partner are eligible for full reimbursement.

Refunds granted in the form of a voucher to the traveler are also eligible for full reimbursement, however will be treated as a travel advance to be applied to future university-related business travel. If the traveler uses the voucher for personal use, it will be reported as income subject to payroll tax withholding per IRS regulations.

Student Success Fee (SSF) proposals that were awarded this year were approved for implementation in spring 2020. Per the SSF policy, unused funds will carry forward and be available for reallocation during the next proposal funding process in fall 2020.

SDSU has suspended all study abroad programs for the spring and summer and inbound and outbound study abroad exchange programs for fall 2020. The university does not have the authority to suspend third-party partner programs in other countries.

Among the spring break and summer programs now suspended are: SDSU faculty-led programs, Transborder programs, Travel embedded in SDSU courses, SDSU’s Health and Human Services 350, and summer SDSU Exchange programs.

It is highly recommended that students consider alternate options for international study. If you are a student who is studying abroad or if you plan to study abroad later this year and have questions about programs, please contact the SDSU Study Abroad office at 619-594-2475 or [email protected]

This site serves as the central repository for information and updates related to SDSU's preparedness, guidance and decisions related to COVID-19. Visit often, as the site is updated frequently.
Yes, SDSU regularly sends email notices to students, faculty and staff about COVID-19. Please check your email regularly.

While SDSU is actively monitoring the global health situation with COVID-19 and has dedicated a team responsible for developing contingency plans, the university has not elevated to emergency status. The university reserves the use of SDSU Alert (the notification system capable of sending text alerts) for campus-wide emergencies. The university is asking all students, faculty and staff to review their university email accounts and this public-facing website, as these are two of the primary modes of communication in use. The university may begin utilizing other channels, including text messages, in the future.

Also, sign up for alerts: Students can register through the Web Portal; faculty, staff and members of the community can register for alerts online.

SDSU's International Student Center, available by calling 619-594-1982, is helping to connect international students to resources as needed.

Some may be concerned or become anxious about friends, relatives, colleagues or classmates who are living in or visiting affected areas. Fear and anxiety about the disease and becoming ill can lead to social stigma towards or discrimination of individuals from certain countries. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes that “Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths. Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.”

In a March 4 vote, the University Senate's executive committee, acting on behalf of the Senate, voted and approved to implement a waiver on the international experience requirement, often referenced as the study abroad graduation requirement.

The waiver is designed to cover spring, summer, and fall suspensions related to COVID-19.

The waiver will apply when a student is in their final year of study, and the study abroad program has been suspended due to the global public health concern associated with the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.